FatherSon Ventures

Building a Relationship through Adventure

Chocolate Lava Cake

Written By: Scot Butwell - Feb• 19•15

lava cake

D and I returned home from our Tuesday night father-son dinner at Denny’s, and he was acting rowdy and rambunctious, shredding a plant he brought in on the living room carpet.

Typical Boy stuff.

L demanded D vacuum it up immediately, and you can judge for yourself, but their ensuing conversation sounded like a police detective interrogating a crime suspect:

lava cake2

“What did you have for dinner?”

“Eggs.”

“And?”

“French Fries.”

“And for dessert?”

“Chocolate Lava Cake.”

His voice rose with joy at the mention of his new favorite dessert which D and I have shared the past couple of weeks, even though D is gluten-free.

“That has…GLUTEN.”

Her voice erupted in anger at his answer, but she was really mad at me. You see, I notice no difference in his behavior when he eats a gluten-free cookie or a cookie with no gluten.

(I still adhere to his gluten-free diet approximately 80 percent of the time.)

As I listened to his L’s interrogation, I thought how the sugar in the ice cream, chocolate syrup and cake could have more of a negative impact than the gluten in the Chocolate Lava Cake.

So I googled “sugar and children’s behavior” and the first article said, there is no link between excess sugar in a child’s diet and their behavior, according to the scientific studies.

Then I googled “gluten and children’s behavior.” There were also no clinical studies to show a correlation between the behavior of kids on the spectrum and a diet consisting of gluten and casein.

L occasionally gets hot flashes when she eats too much sugar. Once, she googled “sugar and hot flashes” and found there were other women who said they experienced the same thing.

I think there is a more plausible explanations for D’s rowdy and rambunctious behavior. He may have shredded a plan just because he wanted to get his mom’s attention.

“You don’t have to do negative things to get your mom’s attention,” L said to D. “You can just say, ‘mom, I want your attention.’ ”

It sounds like she would agree with me.

  • Twitter
  • del.icio.us
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Technorati
  • Reddit
  • Yahoo Buzz
  • StumbleUpon

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.